Blood typing

March 11th, 2011 by admin

Blood typing

Since the early 20th century, blood types have been a source of fascination for the Japanese people. First discovered in 1900 by Karl Landsteiner, the Japanese study of blood types began in 1916, with a research paper by Kimata Hara exploring how blood types could impact personality. This link may have not been supported by data, but papers continued to abound on the topic, even leading the government to attempt to create effective

soldiers based on blood type in the 1930s.

Later, blood typing lost popularity as it was without evidence, but the craze returned in the 1970s based on the writings of journalist Masahiko Nomi. The Japanese enjoy blood typing in a fashion that is similar to Americans’ enjoyment of astrology: an interest or hobby to be enjoyed, but not taken too seriously. Since the 1970′s, Japanese people have kept track of blood types like Americans keep track of baseball players’ statistics. In fact, Japanese baseball cards even show the blood type of the players.

Other examples of the Japanese fascination with blood typing include:

• “Blood Horoscopes” on daytime television that predict the future based on blood type instead of birth sign.
• A large proportion, 90 percent, of Japanese, knows their blood type.
• Blood type was used to personalize training for women’s softball teams, even earning the Japanese Olympics team a gold medal!
• “Instruction manuals” for different blood types regularly make Japanese best-seller lists.
• Sodas for people with different blood types contain different mineral enhancements, to help augment their perceived personality strengths.
• There are even condoms customized to provide optimal sexual experiences for different blood types!

The personality traits that are supposed to correspond to blood types include the following:
• Type A: Conservative, calm, and responsible, but also overcautious and uptight.
• Type B: Creative and impulsive, but can be forgetful and self-centered.
• Type AB: Cool and rational, but also aloof and critical.
• Type O: Outgoing and confident, but sometimes arrogant and jealous.

Anyone with a background in medical assistance knows that blood type doesn’t really determine personality, but it can be of vital importance for blood transfusions and other procedures. If you’re also interested in blood types and phlebotomy, a career as a certified medical assistant may be for you. Look online for more information on medical assistant colleges and medical assistant programs.

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National Employment Outlook for Paramedics and EMTs

March 10th, 2011 by admin

National Employment Outlook for Paramedics and EMTs

National Employment Outlook for Paramedics and EMTs

The outlook for Paramedics and EMTs differs dramatically across the United States, as this info-graphic clearly shows.

It would also seem to illustrate that there is very little regional consistency in terms of growth: Southern states are all over the board in terms of projected job growth, with Arkansas in the under 10% range and Louisiana in the highest projected growth range of over 30%. The West coast would appear to be the only region expected to experience the highest growth across the board, with all states North and West of Texas projected to grow 21 to 30% and more, with Montana and Wyoming being the only exceptions, being in the next lowest range of 16 to 20%. The only other trend discernable is no state north of South Carolina can boast project growth of greater than 25%. (diagram of percentages)

While the outlook may not reveal much in the way of regional trends, the average salaries do seem to display some distinct differences: Paramedics and EMTs in the West coast states like California earn $36,140, while the southern state of Texas remains $31,680, with only a handful of exceptions in the south. One reason for this difference is undoubtedly cost of living, which suddenly makes the relatively higher pay in California and New York look somewhat grim. But the rest of the Northeast really isn’t in any better shape, with most states in the 30k to 35k range and some, for example Pennsylvania ($30,460), remaining in the lowest range possible, hardly 30k.

Looking at both maps together we can say that a few states offer high comparative salaries for Paramedics and EMTs while also promising some of the highest rates of projected job growth. Alaska, for instance, claims the second highest average salary while also promising 27% projected job growth, making it tied for 7th place with

Alabama. Oregon also pays well, the third highest state in the US, while promising a relatively high 26% rate of growth.

But unfortunately, the majority of the states that project the highest growth percentages, specifically 2nd place South Carolina, 3rd Place Louisiana, 4th place Nebraska, and 6th place Texas, all provide the lowest average wages. The rest of the top ten growth states, except for Alaska ($48,050), all fall in the middle range, between 35k and 40k annual wage.

It seems that the Paramedic and EMT professions suffer a trade-off between wages and job growth.

Information gathered from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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CNA Salaries by State

March 10th, 2011 by admin

Salaries for Certified Nursing Assistants in the United States generally range from $17,472 to 31,376 a year.

CNA Salaries by State

The Southern and Mideastern states are at the lower end of the pay range, with the Western and Northeastern states in the higher range. On the map the lighter colored states are in the lower range, and the darker colors indicate higher range states. However, salaries will also vary according to the employer, so high range salaries can be found in low range states. As an employer, the school districts pay the lowest salaries in the low range, and the federal government pays the highest salaries in the high range.

The most important factor in determining salary, above geographic location and employer, is education and experience. Initially, the pay is fairly consistent regardless of education. But as time progresses, it becomes possible for those with more education to gain a higher rate of pay. Over time, the person who is certified will be able to reach a higher salary. Also, the more actual experience you have, the higher potential salary you have.

It is also common to use the position of a CNA as a jumping off point for entering the health care industry. There are many careers available that offer a substantially higher pay rate. Some of these careers are: Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN), Emergency Room RN, Charge Nurse RN, Operating room RN, and Medical Assistant. It is also interesting to note the high female to male ratio – 91 to 9.

Information gathered from PayScale.

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The Fatty Truth – Fast Foods in the US

March 9th, 2011 by LindseyO

The Fatty Truth – Fast Foods in the US

Obesity is a prevalent problem in the United States, and is believed to contribute to over 300,000 deaths each year in this country alone. It can lead to health problems as varied as diabetes, high blood pressure, strokes, and heart attacks, so it is no wonder that fatty foods, such as those served at fast food restaurants, have attracted the attention of health officials. At least four million Americans work in the fast food industry, feeding about a quarter of the population from 300,000 restaurants each day. Fast food is big business; last year, the industry earned $178 billion.

Even the average cuisine at fast food restaurants provides a disproportionate amount of calories, fat, and sodium when compared to the recommended daily allowance, or RDA. A Big Mac value meal contains 1,230 calories, compared to an RDA of 2,000, 48 grams of fat, and 1,330 mg of sodium. The RDA for fat and sodium is 65 g and 2,300 mg, respectively. Meals from Burger King, Jack in the Box, and Wendy’s all have similar nutritional values. The worst culprit for unhealthy fast food meals may be a Triple Baconator Meal from Wendy’s, however, with 2,170 calories, 116 g fat, and 2,950 mg sodium, all of which exceed their RDAs. A large Bacon Ultimate Cheeseburger meal from Jack in the Box approaches these extreme levels, with over 2,000 calories, 94 g fat, and 2,982 mg sodium.

Despite complaints that these restaurants contribute to American obesity, the number of fast food locations has doubled since they first became popular in the 1970′s. Correspondingly, children now eat more than five times the amount of fast food that they did before 1970, leading to increased health problems. Obesity in children has more than tripled since 1980, and diabetes has doubled since 2000. Clearly, this problem will only continue to increase without intervention.

After reading about obesity, you may want to do your part in improving America’s health. One great way to accomplish this is with a career as a medical assistant. If you are interested in this field, look up information on medical assistant programs and medical assistant colleges to get started on your academic journey.

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Medical Malpractice in America

March 9th, 2011 by Trey

Medical malpractice, defined as negligence or omission by medical professionals resulting in patient injury, is a considerable problem in America. Some estimates state that negligence on the part of medical professionals may contribute to up to 98,000 deaths every year. In 1974, a study suggested that 0.8 percent of patients in hospitals were injured due to negligence. Another study two years later lowered this proportion to 0.5 percent. From these studies, estimates put the number of injured American patients in 1988 at over 150,000. In New York, up to 1 percent of patients were injured in a 1984 study, a quarter of whom were already terminally ill. However, state sanctions are only applied to about 0.5 percent of total doctors for malpractice.

In another study, 53 family practitioners were interviewed, and 47 percent revealed that they knew of a case where a patient died due to an error on the part of doctors. Malpractice suits were filed in only four cases, and none of the cases resulted in an inquiry by peer review. Worse yet, another interview revealed that six to ten percent of psychiatrists had sexual relations with at least one patient.

Negligence can have many causes. Doctors reported having gone, on average, over 35 hours without sleep on the job, having around 55 hours each week of being on call, and, in 25 percent of cases, doctors spent over 80 hours a week on call. During the residency period, doctors stated that they had gone without sleep multiple times each week, and ten percent said that their sleep deprivation occurred on a daily basis.

A small proportion of doctors can be responsible for a large proportion of negligence. About 5.1 percent of doctors are involved in over half of all malpractice payouts. But, of 35,000 doctors involved in two or more malpractice suits in the last two decades, only 7.6 percent have faced disciplinary action. Medical costs have doubled in that time, and malpractice insurance costs have risen by half, accounting for three percent of doctors’ revenues.

Medical malpractice can largely be avoided with the proper training. If you are considering a career in the medical field, getting your certified medical assistant training through top-quality medical assisting colleges or medical assistant programs will set you up with the skills you need to succeed. Look online today to start researching medical assisting colleges near you.

Medical Malpractice in America

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What using steroids can do to your body

March 9th, 2011 by admin

Steroids have many legitimate uses in medicine, especially for treating endocrine disorders, but they have garnered media attention recently due to their illegal use by Major League Baseball players. These particular steroids are anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS), which are synthetic modifications of the natural hormone testosterone.

These steroids are illegal without a doctor’s prescription, and have been so since 1990, although Major League Baseball has banned players from using them since the 1970′s. Steroids have a long history of use in professional sports, with the San Diego Chargers believed to be the first team to use them en masse in 1963. Interestingly, their record went from 4-10 to 11-3 in the 1962 and 1963 seasons, and they won the AFL championship in the later year. While Barry Bonds has grown several sizes recently, he has yet to admit to any steroid use.

Steroid use can increase bone marrow, muscle mass, and red blood cell counts, allowing for rapid increases in size and strength. However, steroid misuse can have a variety of negative side effects, including breast growth and testicle shrinkage in men, a lower voice in women, and mood swings, including anger and paranoia.

Many people that use steroids illegally do not control their doses. This can increase strength by 30% and weight by around 30-40 pounds. Steroids can be purchased legally in some countries like Mexico and Thailand, and illegally brought to the United States, or some people order them online.

Sadly, the use of steroids by professional athletes has distorted the opinions of children and young adults. Of high school steroid users, 80 percent said that steroids would help them meet athletic goals, and 57 percent stated that professional athletes had a right to use them, that these athletes inspired them to start using steroids, and that they would continue to use steroids even if it shortened their life span.

If you are interested in the systems that steroids and other hormones can affect, you may want to consider a job as a medical assistant. Look online for information on medical assistant programs and medical assistant schools.

What steroids can do

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Famous Hemopheliacs

March 9th, 2011 by admin

Hemophilia, once known as the “disease of kings” or “royal disease”,  has had many famous people throughout history that suffered from it. Although modern testing techniques can now detect this genetic disorder, for much of history it could only be discovered the hard way: when a person would get injured and not stop bleeding. Unfortunately, death by blood loss was often the outcome of hemophilia before the advent of modern medicine.

Hemophilia first earned its nickname because of Queen Victoria, who transmitted the disorder to her son Leopold, and onward to other royal lineages of Europe. Since the recessive gene for hemophilia is on the X gene, it rarely shows up in women, but if the mother is carrying the gene, her son has a 50% chance of inheriting the syndrome. Other famous historical figures have been confirmed or suspected hemophiliacs.

Richard Burton, the famous actor of the ’60s and ’70s was known for his Academy Award-nominated films and romance with Elizabeth Taylor. He was diagnosed with the syndrome, and even started a foundation, the Richard Burton Hemophilia fund, to help others with this rare condition. He passed away of a cerebral hemorrhage at the relatively young age of 58.

Genghis Khan, perhaps the most famous conqueror of all time, was rumored to have hemophilia. This is impossible to confirm, but the claim is probably not true, since he lived a life of constant war, and a single cut would have been sufficient to kill him.

President Abraham Lincoln was rumored to have hemophilia as well. Although many people have suspected Lincoln had a genetic disorder, his physical traits suggest that he may have had Marfan syndrome instead.

Although Mother Theresa lived an active life to an advanced age, she was rumored to have hemophilia as well, but as stated above, hemophilia in women is rare, and most hemophiliacs die young.

The last Tsar of Russia, Alexi, was a confirmed hemophiliac, and oddly enough, the mystical treatments of the monk Rasputin seemed to help the symptoms.

Ryan White is a recent hemophiliac that contracted AIDS through a blood transfusion, and fought for the rights of hemophiliacs and AIDS victims worldwide.

A career as a medical assistant can help you learn more about hemophilia and other syndromes. If you have an interest in medicine, learn more about medical assistant programs and colleges online.

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Salaries in the Medical Field

March 9th, 2011 by admin

Medical careers offer challenging, but rewarding, jobs, that require a fair amount of education. Here are how various medical positions stack up in terms of wages earned and the cost of schooling.

Medical assistants require an associate’s degree, costing around $5,000 on average to obtain, but earn around $29,760 each year. One advantage of a career as a medical assistant is that it only requires about two years of schooling, and it costs much less to earn an associate’s degree than other degrees, allowing one to gain experience in the medical world rapidly. With a bachelor’s degree, costing around $28,000, one can become a registered nurse and earn about $47,000 per year. Nurses usually have about four years of schooling total.

Primary care physicians earn about $179,060 per year, but need both a bachelor’s and doctorate degree which gets pretty pricey. Specialist physician’s need the same amount of schooling, but can earn significantly more per year or more due to their extensive training through internships and residency programs. Physicians usually attend school for eight years, and spend another few years as residents in a hospital.

Hospital CEOs can earn the most of all, on average, $440,000, and need both bachelors and master’s degrees, which take six years to earn, and cost about $99,000.

Physicians take around eight years to earn their medical degree, after which, they have a period of residency at a hospital in order to earn their certification. Doctors earn anywhere from $30,000-$50,000 each year of residency. The length of residency for different types of doctors varies; while most primary care physicians spend around three years as residents, surgeons usually need about five to six years of residency.

If you are interested in the field of medicine, becoming a certified medical assistant is a great way to get started. You can start by doing online research into medical assistant colleges and medical assistant programs.

Information gathered from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, American College of Healthcare Executives, and Answer.com

 

Salaries in the Medical Field

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Solving the Nursing Shortage

March 8th, 2011 by admin

Solving the Nursing Shortage

The demand for registered nurses is expected to grow 23 percent by 2016, with 587,000 new jobs. Yet, even though nursing is one of the fastest growing careers in the United States, the supply of registered nurses available will simply not be enough to fill these positions, since it is actually decreasing.

There are many reasons why the number of registered nurses is decreasing. One of them is the restrictions on work visas for foreign nurses, who could fill some of these positions. Another is the average age of registered nurses: 42.5 years. This means that many of these nurses will be retiring in the near future, leaving positions that need to be filled. There also just aren’t enough qualified applicants being accepted into nursing school because of the limited amount of nursing instructors.

Meanwhile, the demand continues to increase for a variety of reasons. We have an aging, baby-boomer population, which needs additional care, and hence more registered nurses are needed to provide this care. Our population continues to grow, which also means more nurses are required to provide healthcare services. Obamacare, as well, contributes to this increase. Since more people will be insured and therefore seeking healthcare, more nursing professionals will be needed.

Due to the combination of higher demand for and decreasing supply of nurses, by the year 2020, there will be an estimated shortfall of more than a 1,000,000 nurses. However, there are solutions we can seek to solve this nursing shortfall.

Job security can be increased, attracting more people to the field of nursing. Education is another area that can help lessen the shortfall. Nursing schools need to redesign their programs and the degrees they offer in order to attract more qualified applicants to the nursing field. Wages can also increase, since higher wages definitely attract more people to a career.

The way nurses can seek work and are hired can also affect the shortage of available nurses. To fill many of the open positions available, we can depend on different programs. Allowing nurses to be matched to open shifts through a web-based system, or reverse bidding process, is one way this shortage can be addressed. The use of free-agent nurses who bid on unfulfilled shifts based on hourly rates or a shift bonus also helps with the shortage, as well as the use of a travel nursing company, which provides nurses who travel around the nation to help hospitals fill positions as the shortage grows.

Solving the Nursing Shortage

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Plastic Surgery in the UK

March 8th, 2011 by admin

Plastic Surgery in the UK

Plastic surgery is a relatively recent type of procedure in the medical world, but it has rapidly grown in popularity as people seek to change their appearance, both for aesthetic reasons and to help recover after injury or surgery. In the United Kingdom, 14,000 more people underwent plastic surgery in 2009 than in 2005, for a total of over 36,000 patients.

Of these procedures, the most popular are breast augmentations, eyelid augmentations, face lifts, liposuction, and tummy tucks. While twice as many breast enlargements are performed annually as face lifts, plastic surgery involving the face or stomach are increasing in popularity at a larger rate than breast surgeries. As might be expected by the 8,500 breast augmentations in 2009, women account for 9 out of 10 plastic surgery procedures. However, the number of men undergoing plastic surgery has increased by almost half since 2005, with most of them altering their noses and eyelids. Of course, women are also getting more changes made too; surgery rates in females have increased by 68% in the same time period.

If the number of plastic surgery operations in an area can be considered a measure of vanity, then Londoners and people from North West England pay the most attention to themselves, since they have the highest number of surgery requests per capita. The only city with a higher proportion of requests than London is Sheffield. Most other areas have a moderate amount of surgery requests, except for Scotland, Northern Ireland, and some far-flung island areas. Interestingly, the Outer Hebrides have no requests at all.

Medical assistants play a role in the offices of doctors that perform plastic surgery, so if these procedures interest you, you may want to consider a career in the field. You can get started by looking up medical assistant programs and medical assistant colleges online.

Plastic Surgery in the UK

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