Strange Facts About Cats

March 24th, 2011 by admin

Some interesting facts  about cats, some of which are not as well-known. These relate to cats’ diet, behavior, physical characteristics, reproductive habits, and lifespan. Students at a vet tech school can benefit from keeping some of these facts in mind; this knowledge can sometimes help a vet tech in arriving at a diagnosis. A good veterinary technician is able to recognize which of these cat characteristics are normal and which may be causes for concern.

The name “cat” refers to a general family of meat-eating felines, including lions and tigers. The average house cat can live between 14 and 20 years. A female cat can give birth every 4 months if not sterilized, and females can begin having kittens when they are between 5 and 9 months old. Male cats generally begin mating when they are 7 to 10 months old. The average pregnant female cat has a litter after about 58 days of gestation, and kittens stick with their mother for roughly the first 9 weeks of life.

Once fully grown, a cat has 500 different skeletal muscles; it also has up to 10% of its total number of bones within its tail. A cat that is in good physical shape can jump up to 7 times the length of its tail. Unlike some other animals with fur, cats have a true undercoat and overcoat. Cats that have white fur and pale skin on their ears should be kept indoors during sunny weather, since they can get sunburned much more easily.

Cats reportedly respond more positively to women than to men, and they also react to higher-pitched “ee” names. Since women have higher voices, these facts may be related. Cat owners can gauge a cat’s mood by the appearance of its eyes. Cats’ bodies can not produce fat on their own, so it must be included in their diets to maintain proper health. Some owners give their cats cow’s milk without realizing that cats can not digest it, leading to diarrhea. Owners may also wonder why cats have trouble finding treats dropped on the floor; this is because cats can not directly see underneath their noses.

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Who has a Sphynx Cat?

March 21st, 2011 by admin

infographic about the sphynx cat

Who has a Sphynx Cat?

This infographic provides a set of useful and interesting facts about Sphynx cats, including those pertaining to this unique breed’s personality traits, special care needs, and physical characteristics. The information may be helpful to vet tech students who are not familiar with Sphynx cats. A vet tech school that incorporates cat breed studies could easily include these facts on the Sphynx.

The first consideration for both an owner and veterinary technician is that while the Sphynx is not completely hairless, this cat breed does require some special hygiene care. A Sphynx actually has a fine covering of very thin hair that may be thicker or longer on its tail, ears, nose, and toes. This sparse hair is the result of a genetic mutation that naturally occurs approximately every 25 years. One area the Sphynx does not have hair is within the ear canals, so owners need to clean out their cat’s ears on a regular basis.

A Sphynx cat should also be bathed on a weekly basis to remove dirt and built-up skin oils. Nailbeds need to be cleaned as well to prevent discharge. Sphynx cat coloring is unique, resulting from skin pigmentation; this coloring can be any range of colors that also appear in other cat breeds. If a Sphynx cat carries the genetic trait of fine white hair, this cat often has two differently-colored eyes.

Sphynx cats have quite friendly personalities and will socialize even with strangers, so owners should be cautious about this trait. These cats can be quite expensive, costing up to $1,500. Unfortunately, it is not unheard of for them to be stolen as a result. Sphynx cats are known for following their owners everywhere throughout the house and will even try to curl up in the owner’s bed as well.

A Sphynx cat owner should invest in high quality meats and remember that a Sphynx cat needs to eat about twice the amount of food as other cat breeds in order to generate enough body heat. A Sphynx will also seek the warmest areas possible within the house. Due to near-hairlessness, a Sphynx needs to be kept indoors to avoid becoming sunburned.

Other characteristics of a Sphynx cat are strong joints and flexible toes that can actually pick up small objects. Good news about a Sphynx is that it can live for up to 15 years with no major health problems. A Sphynx cat can also be easily obtained in over 50 different countries.

Infographic from: http://sphynxcatblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/sphynx-cat-inforgraphic.jpg

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Don’t Touch the Cat!

March 21st, 2011 by admin

cat anatomy

Don’t Touch the Cat!

This image is a tongue in cheek illustration of the willingness of cats to have various parts of their anatomy touched. Vet techs and those in vet school can find this a fun source of trade humor, but can also use it as a quick and easy way of learning how to best handle cats. This is important information for veterinary technicians and individuals who are studying to become a vet tech as an understanding of cat behavior and touchiness about its body will minimize stress on the animal and the vet tech safe and performing their job most efficiently. It is also useful information to pass on to new pet owners as well as important to teach young children who are living with cats. However silly, vet techs can consider using this image as a teaching tool for people unfamiliar with cats. If cats are mistreated by rough handling, it can break any trust developed with the animal and result in painful bites or scratches from the cat.

This image, which diagrams feline anatomy to illustrate areas that cats do not appreciate having handled, shows that cats are particularly sensitive about their undersides and their feet being touched. Cat tails and ears are other areas that should be handled with care as many cats are irritable about these areas being touched as well. The danger of reaching into these sensitive areas is, as the image shows, that cats are well equipped and well prepared to defend themselves with the use of all four sets of claws and their bites. Cats usually have an independent feline attitude and are typically not hesitant to enforce their boundaries. It behooves human owners and other handlers of cats to learn the rules that cats have set and adapt to ease feline comfort. By avoiding the stomach, feet, ears, and tail of a cat one can generally also avoid meeting the claws or teeth of a cat.

Although cats are portrayed as having unpredictable thought processes, this isn’t exactly true. Knowing the rules of anatomy to avoid touching is a good start. Cat behavior can be read in the eyes by checking if they are dilated, in the tail by responding to anxious twitching, in the ears which are back if the cat is angered, and in their overall condition of the fur and body language of the cat if it is crouching or defensive.

Infographic from: http://catsareassholes.tumblr.com/post/3680454163/thedailywhat-fixed-infographic-of-the

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